English, motherf**ker, do you speak it? (Part 4)

A five part series on words with cinematic origins

PART 4

7. bunny-boiler (Fatal Attraction, 1987)

fatalattraction

Definition: (noun) a woman who acts vengefully after having been spurned by her lover (according to Oxford English Dictionary)

To use it in a sentence: She may be a bunny-boiler but she’s not Basic Instinct Sharon Stone crazy.

stone

How did it originate?

This is a reference to a scene from the film Fatal Attraction where a pissed off Glenn Close seeks payback on Michael Douglas by boiling his pet rabbit. Now, it has become a part of our cultural lexicon as well as a cautionary tale for men about the disastrous consequences of having a clingy, possessive and overbearing mistress. The pejorative term was first used, three years after the film’s release, in a 1990 interview given by Glenn Close to the US magazine the Ladies’ Home Journal. She noted, “There’s nothing like portraying a psychopathic bunny-boiler to boost one’s self-esteem.”

  1. padawan (Star Wars)

yoda

Definition: (noun) any apprentice or student

To use it in a sentence: Vladimir Putin was proud of his padawan, Donald Trump.

trump-gif-quotes

How did it originate?luke

The Star Wars films depict quintessential tales of good versus evil (in this case, Jedi vs. Sith). It became a pop culture phenomenon soon after its inception, thanks to its twitterpated global fan following. Padawan was coined by George Lucas himself for the franchise.

PART 1  PART 2  PART 3  PART 4  PART 5

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